Adult Non-Fiction

Everybody’s Heard About the Bird: The True Story of 1960s Rock ‘n’ Roll in Minnesota

Everybody’s Heard About the Bird: The True Story of 1960s Rock ‘n’ Roll in Minnesota

If you didn t experience rock and roll in Minnesota in the 1960s, this book will make you wish you had. This behind-the-scenes, up-close-and-personal account relates how a handful of Minnesota rock bands erupted out of a small Midwest market and made it big. It was a brief, heady moment for the musicians who found themselves on a national stage, enjoying a level of success most bands only dream of. In “Everybody’s Heard about the Bird,” Rick Shefchik writes of that time in vivid detail. Interviews with many of the key musicians, combined with extensive research and a phenomenal cache of rare photographs, reveal how this monumental era of Minnesota rock music evolved. The chronicle begins with musicians from the 1950s and...

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Dirty Copper

Dirty Copper

In “Dirty Copper,” Jim Northrup returns to the story of Luke Warmwater, an Anishinaabe man who returns to the Reservation after serving in Vietnam. This prequel to Northrup’s classic novel “Walking the Rez Road” deals with the emotions and cultural changes Warmwater struggles with immediately following his service in Vietnam. He becomes a deputy sheriff on the Rez, fighting crime and racism, and is bothered by flashbacks of the war, which are intense at first but gradually become less frequent as time goes on. Author: Jim Northrup Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing US SRP: $16.95 Binding: Paperback Pub Date: July 1, 2014

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Henry Boucha, Ojibwa

Henry Boucha, Ojibwa

A compeling autobiography of the true life story of Native American Olympian Henry Boucha’s Olympic Silver, and NHL Star rise to stardom, the tragedy, and the climb back to glory. A full-blooded Ojibwa Native American, Henry Charles Boucha is one of six medaled Native American Olympic athletes, having received the silver medal as part of the United States Olympic hockey team at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. His love of hockey started as a youth in Warroad, Minnesota, where he played for Warroad High School. While serving in the US Army, he joined the national ice hockey team. In 1971, he was drafted by the Detroit Red Wings and was voted Detroit rookie of the year in his first full NHL season. Boucha was inducted into the...

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Paddling to Winter

Paddling to Winter

Julie Buckles and Charly Ray built a wood and canvas canoe, exchanged marriage vows, and paddled away from their front yard, planning to travel 2,700 miles to the Arctic Ocean and winter over in a tiny cabin. What a honeymoon! Told in Julie’s page-turning style, their story is full of humor and humility, rapids and relationships, love and life. It’s an adventure about a couple’s wilderness journey from Lake Superior to the Canadian north. Author: Julie Buckles Publisher: Raven Productions US SRP: $17.95 Binding: Paperback Pub Date: September 13, 2013

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The Keillor Reader

The Keillor Reader

Stories, essays, poems, and personal reminiscences from the sage of Lake Wobegon When, at thirteen, he caught on as a sportswriter for the Anoka Herald, Garrison Keillor set out to become a professional writer, and so he has done–a storyteller, sometime comedian, essayist, newspaper columnist, screenwriter, poet. Now a single volume brings together the full range of his work: monologues from” A Prairie Home Companion,” stories from “The New Yorker” and “The Atlantic,” excerpts from novels, newspaper columns. With an extensive introduction and headnotes, photographs, and memorabilia, “The Keillor Reader” also presents pieces never before published, including the essays...

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Her Honor

Her Honor

While there is no single hero of the Minnesota women’s movement, Rosalie Wahl, the first woman on the Minnesota Supreme Court, changed the way her fellow judges saw the cases they decided. A champion of both women’s rights and civil rights, she brought new attention to the problems that faced women impoverished by divorce, women abused by their partners, and others who coped with poverty and discrimination. With sharp intelligence and hard work, Wahl herself had overcome childhood tragedy and a difficult marriage to become a defense attorney, a respected judge, and a mentor to many. As essential backdrop to Wahl’s inspiring story, Lori Sturdevant charts the progress of the women’s rights movement in Minnesota and...

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The Bohemian Flats

The Bohemian Flats

In “The Bohemian Flats,” Mary Relindes Ellis’s rich, imaginative gift carries us from the bourgeois world of fin de siecle Germany to a vibrant immigrant enclave in the heart of the Midwest and to the killing fields of World War I. Shell shock, as it was called, lands Raimund Kaufmann in a London hospital, a victim of the war but also of his own, and his brother’s, efforts to get out of Germany and build a new life in America. While his recovery eludes him, his memory returns us to Minneapolis, to the Flats, a milling community on the Mississippi River, where Raimund and his brother Albert have sought respite from the oppressive hand of their older brother, now the master of the family farm and brewery. In Minnesota...

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Conflicted Mission

Conflicted Mission

From the mid-1830s to the 1860s, the missionaries sent to Minnesota by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) wrote thousands of letters to their supervisors and supporters claiming success in converting the Dakota people. But author Linda M. Clemmons reveals that the reality of the situation was far more conflicted than what those written records would suggest. In fact, in the rough Minnesota territory, missionaries often found themselves looking to the Dakota for support. The missionaries and their wives struggled to define what it meant to convert and “civilize” Dakota people. And, although many scholars depict missionaries as working hand in hand with the federal government, Clemmons reveals...

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November’s Fury

November’s Fury

On Thursday, November 6, the “Detroit News” forecasted “moderate to brisk” winds for the Great Lakes. On Friday, the “Port Huron Times-Herald” predicted a “moderately severe” storm. Hourly the warnings became more and more dire. Weather forecasting was in its infancy, however, and radio communication was not much better; by the time it became clear that a freshwater hurricane of epic proportions was developing, the storm was well on its way to becoming the deadliest in Great Lakes maritime history. The ultimate story of man versus nature, “November’s Fury” recounts the dramatic events that unfolded over those four days in 1913, as captains eager–or at times forced–to finish the season tried to outrun the massive...

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Thirty Rooms to Hide In

Thirty Rooms to Hide In

NOW IN PAPERBACK! “Thirty Rooms to Hide”"In” tells the story of Sullivan’s father and his descent from being one of the world’s top orthopedic surgeons at the Mayo Clinic to a man who is increasingly abusive, alcoholic, and insane, ultimately dying alone on the floor of a Georgia motel. For his wife and six sons, the years prior to his death were years of turmoil, anger, and family dysfunction; but somehow, they were also a time of real happiness for Sullivan and his five brothers, full of dark humor and much laughter. Through the 1950s and 1960s, the six brothers had a wildly fun and thoroughly dysfunctional childhood living in a forbidding thirty-room mansion, known as the Millstone, on the outskirts of...

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Rez Salute

Rez Salute

Since 2001 Indian Country has seen great changes, touching everything from treaty rights to sovereignty issues to the rise (and sometimes the fall) of gambling and casinos. With unsparing honesty and a good dose of humor, Jim Northrup takes readers through the last decade, looking at the changes in Indian Country, as well as daily life on the rez. Jim Northrup is an award-winning journalist, poet, and playwright. His syndicated column “Fond du Lac Follies” was named Best Column at the 1999 Native American Journalists Association convention. Author: Jim Northrup Publisher: Fulcrum US SRP: $17.95 Binding: Paperback Pub Date: October 12, 2012

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Harriman vs Hill

Harriman vs Hill

In 1901, the Northern Pacific was an unlikely prize: a twice-bankrupt construction of the federal government, it was a two-bit railroad (literally–five years back, its stock traded for twenty-five cents a share). But it was also a key to connecting eastern markets through Chicago to the rising West. Two titans of American railroads set their sights on it: James J. Hill, head of the Great Northern and largest individual shareholder of the Northern Pacific, and Edward Harriman, head of the Union Pacific and the Southern Pacific. The subsequent contest was unprecedented in the history of American enterprise, pitting not only Hill against Harriman but also Big Oil against Big Steel and J. P. Morgan against the Rockefellers, with a...

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Original Local

Original Local

Local foods have garnered much attention in recent years, but the concept is hardly new: indigenous peoples have always made the most of nature’s gifts. Their menus were truly the “original local,” celebrated here in sixty home-tested recipes paired with profiles of tribal activists, food researchers, families, and chefs. A chapter on wild rice makes clear the crucial role manoomin plays in cultural and economic survival. A look at freshwater fish is concerned with shifts in climate and threats to water purity as it reveals the deep relationship between Ojibwe people and indigenous fish species such as Ginoozhii, the Muskie, Ogaa, the Walleye, and Adikamig, Whitefish. Health concerns have encouraged Ojibwe, Dakota, and...

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The Dakota Prisoner of War Letters

The Dakota Prisoner of War Letters

In April 1863–after the Dakota War of 1862, after the hanging of thirty-eight Dakota men in the largest mass execution in U.S. history– some 270 Dakota men were moved from Mankato, Minnesota, to a prison at Camp McClellan in Davenport, Iowa. Separated from their wives, children, and elder relatives, with inadequate shelter, they lived there for three long, wretched years. More than 120 men died. Desperate to connect with their families, many of these prisoners of war learned to write. Their letters, mostly addressed to the missionaries Stephen R. Riggs and Thomas S. Williamson, asked for information, for assistance, and for help sending and receiving news of their loved ones. Dakota elders Clifford Canku and Michael Simon,...

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Rez Life

Rez Life

Celebrated novelist David Treuer has gained a reputation for writing fiction that expands the horizons of Native American literature. In “Rez Life,” his first full-length work of nonfiction, Treuer brings a novelist’s storytelling skill and an eye for detail to a complex and subtle examination of Native American reservation life, past and present. With authoritative research and reportage, Treuer illuminates misunderstood contemporary issues like sovereignty, treaty rights, and natural-resource conservation. He traces the convoluted waves of public policy that have deracinated, disenfranchised, and exploited Native Americans, exposing the tension and conflict that has marked the historical relationship between the United...

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Canoeing With the Cree – Collector’s Edition

Canoeing With the Cree – Collector’s Edition

In 1930 two novice paddlers–Eric Sevareid and Walter C. Port–launched a secondhand eighteen-foot canvas canoe into the Minnesota River at Fort Snelling for an ambitious summer-long journey from Minneapolis to Hudson Bay. First published in 1935, “Canoeing with the Cree” is Sevareid’s classic account of this youthful odyssey to a vast and remote land, that has inspired generations of canoeists, wilderness enthusiasts and armchair adventurers. In our era of GPS, cell phones, power bars, and bug spray, the young men’s account is all the more remarkable and nostalgic. Relive their quintessential adventure with this limited-edition book and map set. It includes a newly designed book, a handsome multipurpose...

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The Oranges Are Sweet

The Oranges Are Sweet

From Minnesota author Paul Sailer comes “The Oranges are Sweet” which is a deeply moving story about Major Don M. Beerbower, who was from Hill City, Minnesota,  and the men who served with him during World War II. When he died strafing a German airdrome north of Reims, France, on August 9, 1944, he was the leading ace in the Ninth Air Force with 15.5 aerial victories and the commanding officer of the 353rd Fighter Squadron. The Fighting Cobras, as the unit was known, ended the war with 290.5 aerial victories, more than any other squadron in the United States Army Air Forces. Author: Paul Sailer Publisher: Loden Books US SRP: $34.99 Binding: Hardcover Pub Date: May 1,...

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Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid To Ask

Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid To Ask

What have you always wanted to know about Indians? Do you think you should already know the answers–or suspect that your questions may be offensive? In matterof-fact responses to over 120 questions, both thoughtful and outrageous, modern and historical, Ojibwe scholar and cultural preservationist Anton Treuer gives a frank, funny, and sometimes personal tour of what’s up with Indians, anyway. - What is the real story of Thanksgiving? - Why are tribal languages important? - What do you think of that incident where people died in a sweat lodge? White/Indian relations are often characterized by guilt and anger. Everything You Wanted to Know about Indians But Were Afraid to Ask cuts through the emotion and builds a foundation for true...

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The Last Hunter – An American Family Album

The Last Hunter – An American Family Album

Minnesota’s Will Weaver has been a hunter since he was a young boy, following in the footsteps of his father, a dedicated and seasoned outdoorsman. As he writes, “in the fall, when Canada geese came through and when partridge season opened, [we] heard the far-off thudding report of shotguns–and in November the heavier poom-poom! of deer rifles.” Hunting frames Weaver’s childhood memories, his relationship with his father, and his own definition of self. And although one side of his family lineage includes men who would not hunt, or go to war, or carry a rifle, Weaver is caught off guard when his son and daughter show no interest in upholding the tradition of the hunt. “The Last Hunter “is a...

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The Assassination of Hole in the Day

The Assassination of Hole in the Day

Explores the murder of the controversial Ojibwe chief who led his people through the first difficult years of dispossession by white invaders–and created a new kind of leadership for the Ojibwe.   Author: Anton Treuer Publisher: Borealis Books US SRP: $17.95 Binding: Paperback Pub Date: August 1, 2011

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